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SSANZ Newsletter Oct 2020

By Phil Cregeen, SSANZ

Despite what you may think about the election result two good things for the firearm community have come about from the way you cast your votes. SSANZ member and firearm advocate Nicole McKee now has a seat in parliament, and she is supported by ACT leader David Seymour and a caucus of 8 additional ACT MPs.

 

While ACT may not have a place on the government benches as we had hoped, a party of 10 MPs has a much stronger voice for asking hard questions and the ability to participate in Select Committees and other cross-party activities. As well as proposing sensible solutions to the many issues that face parliament in these post Covid times.

 

WHAT DOES THE ELECTION RESULT MEAN FOR FIREARM OWNERS?

With Labour able to govern alone, with or without the Greens, there will be no reversal of the anti-firearm laws passed in June. And without NZ First in government there will be no pressure to keep to the proposed Independent Authority to manage firearm administration.

 

So what is on the statutes now will go ahead for the next 3 years, bringing more pain and frustration to the firearm community as NZ Police come to grips with the monster they have created and implement the new rules and regulations.

 

We know there will be a second confiscation (buyback) of firearms declared prohibited in the most recent Arms Legislation Act. These include short semi-automatics, (those that were technically classed as pistols), centrefire pump-action rifles with detachable magazines or magazines that hold more than 10 rounds, and any firearm that contains a centrefire lower receiver.

 

“In the present financial climate it might even be prudent to shelve the expense of a firearm registry, which we all know will, at great taxpayer cost, serve no practical purpose other than make the government feel good.”

 

However, speculation about further types of firearm being banned is as far as we know, simply speculation. We have seen no evidence to suggest that is on the cards. One might also argue that the government has more things to worry about now with the Covid recovery than contemplate more tinkering with the Arms Act.

 

In the present financial climate it might even be prudent to shelve the expense of a firearm registry, which we all know will, at great taxpayer cost, serve no practical purpose other than make the government feel good.

 

WHERE TO FROM HERE?

All firearm owners need to put aside their political and personal differences and unite in preparation for election 2023. We need to get behind and support those MPs who have supported us and sign up to those organisations that advocate for us.

 

COLFO is the largest of these organisations, representing all 12 major shooting Association and SSANZ is part of that Council. While COLFO represents the vast majority of club shooters, SSANZ, while having many club members, seeks to represent all those shooters, some 200,000, who belong to no club and give them a voice.

 

We need firearm dealers to actively support these organisations and we in turn need to support our local dealers. We are all dependent upon each other for our long-term survival.

  

SSANZ Is working hard to engage with local firearm dealers around the country and recruit new members from the many hunters and firearm owners who enjoy their sport outside of a club environment.

 

ADOPT A COP

Here is a practical suggestion that will help improve relations between shooters and frontline cops and help to make New Zealand Safer. (Ed)

 

A couple of events occurred recently that inspired a thought or two...

 

Firstly, about a month ago, I and a fellow club member introduced a lady friend (who expressed an interest) to the realities and joys of shooting.

 

During that time, it struck me that in the space of 3 hours on the range, she not only experienced the sensations and techniques of multiple calibres and platforms (long and hand guns), but had also likely fired more rounds, than I understand each sworn policeman is given to become "proficient" each year.

 

“These interactions got me thinking that as a more positive approach to influencing the frontline officers, clubs could consider offering to 'adopt a cop' (or two) and support them (possibly by way of training and competition) to become safe and more skilled with firearms.”

 

Secondly, another friend, (who is a local police officer & former soldier, not unfamiliar with many firearm types, joined the club in order to become familiar, proficient and confident with the use of his 'work tools', although already holding a basic firearms licence.

 

He also, interestingly, demonstrated a potentially dangerous 'modification' to identify the Glock pistol each patrol car carries (to which a potential solution was suggested).

 

These interactions got me thinking that as a more positive approach to influencing the frontline officers, clubs could consider offering to 'adopt a cop' (or two) and support them (possibly by way of training and competition) to become safe and more skilled with firearms.

 

I’m unsure as to what format this might take, but I’m sure that each club could research and determine the best local approach?

 

THE REAL DANGER OF A FULL FIREARM REGISTER

A personal view by a professional database engineer.

 

The government will never be able to attain a 100% compliance or 100% accurate firearms registry, no matter what they do. If they attempt to, however they go about doing it, it will cost too much to be practical. Then it's just a matter of hacking the government servers to get it and sell it.

 

In my opinion, the main concern all citizens of New Zealand should have, is not how to implement an accurate or complete firearms registry, but how much is a consolidated digital list of all firearms, calibres, model numbers, name, address, storage details worth on the black market.

 

“The government will never be able to attain a 100% compliance or 100% accurate firearms registry, no matter what they do. If they attempt to, however they go about doing it, it will cost too much to be practical. ”

 

It becomes an absurdly valuable asset to gain access to this information. And the taxpayer will be funding the most incompetent people in this country to do the busy work of collecting all that super-valuable information into one place. 

 

There must have been 4 major public breeches in the last 3 years. If you put information into a digital system, no matter how secure they say it is, it is as good as public domain (or at least black-market domain).

 

This should be the primary focus, in my opinion, of tearing down the sensibility of a firearms registry: the ability of the police to secure this data against criminals.

 

Phil Cregeen

SSANZ Sec.

www.sportingshooters.nz

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